Architectural Details: Porte Cochère

The porte cochère is a direct extension of the home and many times the first structure one sees.

A French word meaning 'coach gateway', a porte cochère was popularized more than 300 years ago as an architectural element that provided coverage to carriages upon their arrival to and departure from a home.

Today, the porte cochère is typically seen at schools, hotels, and many country clubs, and serves a necessary function. Not to be confused with porticos, the porte cochère is designed to be large enough for the cover of vehicles, and shelter residents and guests as they filter in and out of buildings.

 

At Meyer & Meyer, our designs are carefully thought out to fit the needs, lifestyles and aesthetic of our clients. When we have introduced the idea of including a porte cochère to clients in the past, we have found that they are often unfamiliar with the design element. 

 

Our firm's vast knowledge of period detailing and expertise in authentic historical architecture informs unique porte cochère designs that are elegant and in complete concert with the main home design.

 

The porte cochère is a direct extension of the home and many times the first structure one sees when approaching the home. As it serves as the main entryway, it is here that we can instill the deeling of the home and provide a first impression that will continue throughtout the entire property. Oftentimes, the materials and details used in the porte cochère echo those of the house, and it is this harmony that allows our porte cocheres to make a grand entrace in a subtle manner.

 

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